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dearlg1
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PostSubject: Celtic Art & Music   Sun Nov 08, 2009 5:01 am

Thr mystics dream of Avalon
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PHkCmtOI6u0
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PostSubject: Celtic   Sun Nov 08, 2009 2:05 pm

Awesome Dearlg1, I hope to see more additions in this category. I loved the Celts & their way of
looking at nature, as well as the world we live in. I love the Druids. I fact in the Mystic mountain
section, I touched on Celtic-Druids astrology. I wish you much strength on your journey, dear
friend of a kindred spirit. Many blessings from the mother to you.
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Sun Nov 08, 2009 5:34 pm

Thank you very much lightsun, I will cherish and welcome all of Mothers blessings.
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Sun Nov 08, 2009 5:47 pm

Loreena McKennitt-The Mummers Dance
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0B7sH5QLyXY


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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Sun Nov 08, 2009 6:05 pm

Loreena Mckennitt-The Bonny Swans
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLnKdNJK5D8

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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Sun Nov 08, 2009 8:57 pm

Sidhe Riders on the eve of Beltaine
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Sun Nov 08, 2009 9:02 pm

THE TWO TREES
Words by: William Butler Yeats (1865-1939)

Sung by Loreena McKennitt

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsYINRjr9dw

BELOVED, gaze in thine own heart,
The holy tree is growing there;
From joy the holy branches start,
And all the trembling flowers they bear.
The changing colours of its fruit
Have dowered the stars with merry light;
The surety of its hidden root
Has planted quiet in the night;
The shaking of its leafy head
Has given the waves their melody,
And made my lips and music wed,
Murmuring a wizard song for thee.
There the Loves a circle go,
The flaming circle of our days,
Gyring, spiring to and fro
In those great ignorant leafy ways;
Remembering all that shaken hair
And how the wingèd sandals dart,
Thine eyes grow full of tender care:
Beloved, gaze in thine own heart.
Gaze no more in the bitter glass
The demons, with their subtle guile,
Lift up before us when they pass,
Or only gaze a little while;
For there a fatal image grows
That the stormy night receives,
Roots half hidden under snows,
Broken boughs and blackened leaves.
For all things turn to barrenness
In the dim glass the demons hold,
The glass of outer weariness,
Made when God slept in times of old.
There, through the broken branches, go
The ravens of unresting thought;
Flying, crying, to and fro,
Cruel claw and hungry throat,
Or else they stand and sniff the wind,
And shake their ragged wings; alas!
Thy tender eyes grow all unkind:
Gaze no more in the bitter glass.
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Sun Nov 08, 2009 9:29 pm

Loreena McKennitt has always been one of my favorite performers. I was gratified to see that she has resumed her career.
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Mon Nov 09, 2009 8:25 am

the wolf song
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cq_VeUMtyzU
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Mon Nov 09, 2009 8:52 am

Celtic Legend
www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2D1NLMWt4A
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PostSubject: Celtic   Tue Nov 17, 2009 12:49 am

dearlg1, where did you get the gorgeous picture of the Sidhe Riders on the Eve
of Beltaine? What site did you download this picture? What is the web address/URL?
I would greatly appreciate this. I have a partial love affair of the Druids & Celtic
people.
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Tue Nov 17, 2009 7:05 am

lightsun wrote:
dearlg1, where did you get the gorgeous picture of the Sidhe Riders on the Eve
of Beltaine? What site did you download this picture? What is the web address/URL?
I would greatly appreciate this. I have a partial love affair of the Druids & Celtic
people.

Google Celtic Sidhe, switch to images. You'lll find all kinds of neat stuff, including that one.
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Tue Nov 17, 2009 7:12 am

A proud but defeated Vercingetorix before Caesar after the battle of Alesia

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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Tue Nov 17, 2009 8:48 am

Tristan and Isolde

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xnwy5rezDuE
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Fri Nov 20, 2009 3:19 pm



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuNG_shQV2s&feature=PlayList&p=0AE09B8C6EF83A5B&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=29

Arrow

http://www.celticgrounds.com/chapters/c-nations.htm

andromeda polifolia bloom - rosemary
\!!
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Fri Nov 20, 2009 9:06 pm

dearlg1 wrote:
A proud but defeated Vercingetorix before Caesar after the battle of Alesia
For a good fictionalized account of this war from the side of the Gauls, see Morgan Llywelyn's novel Druids.
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PostSubject: Celtic   Sat Nov 21, 2009 1:02 am

I've read the book, good pick. Morgan Llywelyn in fact does a whole series of books dealing
with Celtic culture.
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Sat Nov 21, 2009 7:21 am

Brennus
Brennus crossed the Apennines in 391 B.C., ravaged Etruria, and annihilated a Roman army of about 40,000 men on the Allia some 12 m. from Clusium (July 16, 390). Rome thus lay at his mercy, but he wasted time, and the Romans were able to occupy and provision the Capitol (though they had not sufficient forces to defend their walls) and to send their women and children to Veii. When on the third day the Gauls took possession, they found the city occupied only by those aged patricians who had held high office in the state. For a while the Gauls withheld their hands out of awe and reverence, but the ruder passions soon prevailed. The city was sacked and burnt; but the Capitol itself withstood a siege of more than six months, saved from surprise on one occasion only by the wakefulness of the sacred geese and the courage of Marcus Manlius. At last the Gauls consented to accept a ransom of a thousand pounds of gold. As it was being weighed out, the Roman tribune complained of some unfairness. Brennus at once threw his heavy sword into the scale; and when asked the meaning of the act, replied that it meant Vae victis (" woe to the conquered"). The Gauls returned home with their plunder, leaving Rome in a condition from which she took long to recover. A later legend, probably an invention, represents M. Furius Camillus as suddenly appearing with an avenging army at the moment when the gold was being weighed, and defeating Brennus and all
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Sat Nov 21, 2009 9:59 am


Artist: George Henry
Title: The Druids Bringing in the Mistletoe
Date: 1890
Medium: Oil on canvas
Description:
152.4 by 152.4 cm.
This vibrant canvas, painted by Hornel and Henry, was inspired by the interest at that time in the archaelogical discoveries about Kirkcudbright, evidence of which can also be found in The Brownie of Blednoch. The Druids is a fine contribution to the Celtic Revival of the 1890s, most closely associated with the artist John Duncan
Gallery: Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow
Location: Dumfries and Galloway
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PostSubject: Celtic   Sat Nov 21, 2009 1:47 pm

Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful. Thank you so much for sharing this thread and avenue of approach
with dealing with the Celtic and Druids culture. I find it is necessary to understand these varied
and unique cultures. First Native American, then Graeco-Roman & now Celtic!!! sunny sunny sunny
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Sun Nov 22, 2009 4:32 pm

Boudicca

Boudicca (Boadicea) is one of Britain’s greatest heroines, a freedom fighter that rebelled against the Roman government. Her rebellion was the only viable challenge to the supremacy of the Romans who, until the fifth century, exercised a distinct influence over Britain and its heritage. Boudicca was queen of the Iceni people of Eastern England and led a major uprising against occupying Roman forces. Her husband Prasutagus, ruler of the Iceni people of East Anglia, when the Romans conquered southern England in AD 43, they allowed Prasutagus to continue to rule. However, when Prasutagus died the Romans decided to rule the Iceni directly and confiscated the property of the leading tribesmen. They are also said to have stripped and flogged Boudicca and raped her daughters. These actions exacerbated widespread resentment at Roman rule.
Around 60 or 61 AD, while the Roman governor Gaius Suetonius Paullinus was leading a campaign in North Wales, the Iceni rebelled. Members of other tribes joined them. Boudicca's warriors successfully defeated the Roman Ninth Legion and destroyed the capital of Roman Britain, then at Colchester. They went on to destroy London and Verulamium (St Albans). Thousands were killed. Finally, a Roman army led by Paulinus defeated Boudicca. Many Britons were killed and Boudicca is thought to have poisoned herself to avoid capture. The site of the battle, and of Boudicca's death, are unknown.
Boudicca is portrayed as a typical Celtic warrior woman and in the Celtic tradition these legendary women warriors were a big part of history. In Celtic society, females had equal standing to men. they fought and hunted side by side with the men and had the same rights to property and respect. In Celtic lands women were owned communally, and wealth seems to have been based largely on the size of cattle herd owned. The lot of women was a good deal better than in most societies of that time. They were technically equal to men, owned property, and could choose their own husbands. They could also be war leaders, as Boudicca later proved.
However, Boadicca, Queen of the Icenis was of the one most remembered. After their home were savage plundered, the women violated and their men killed, Boadicca formed her “clan of warriors” that swept across Europe defending the Celtic lands and ways and fighting for justice against the Romans. She was later referred to “Amazon”, a term given to all women were honorable, courageous, brave and excelled in combat and did not abide a “patriarch society”. The term ‘Amazon’ is thought to come from an Armenian word, meaning 'moon women'. Artemis or Diana was the goddess of Moon and Hunt and was the Amazon's patron goddess.
Exploring the myth of the ancient Celts especially as they focus on female deities. The myths of the ancient Celts suggest the dominant role of the Celtic female, or at least they point up a society that was at one time ‘matrifocused’, that is, focused on women. Further, the evolution of these myths suggests a distinct shift in consciousness shaped by the warrior ethos. "Women were highly honored, female symbolism formed the most sacred images in the religious cosmos, and the relationship with motherhood was the central elements of the social fabric, the society was held together by common allegiance to the customs of the tribe loosely organized around the traditions of the goddess".
In Irish mythology and later Arthurian tales, women warriors teach the famous heroes chivalry, mystical wisdom (possibly Druidic lore), and feats of arms. The wooing of Emer is one such tale. Scáthach nUanaind taught the great Irish hero Cúchulainn, on the Isle of Skye, how to fight. Skye was one of many schools or academies of martial arts run by women. The myths say it takes these women a year and a day to train a hero.
These women warriors are called banaisgedaig, ban feinnidi, and bantuathaig and they are credited as having the magical power of transformation, somewhat like berserker rage, where the face is flush red and the neck and arms swell. On the whole, these female champions are described as both beautiful and courageous. These heroines were not all muscle and no brains; they were also accomplished in the arts and sciences. Sometimes referred to as Ban-faith or "prophetess" they were experts in divination and supernatural wisdom. If these female heroines were indeed Ban-faiths, then it these warrior women were also a subclass of the Druids, just as the Faiths and Ovates were a subclass of the Druids.
In a nutshell, the Celtic warrior women represent all the values to rule a society, they are synonym of courage and leadership, and their feats a bequest of freedom
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Sun Nov 22, 2009 4:50 pm

dearlg1 wrote:
Boudicca

Boudicca (Boadicea) is one of Britain’s greatest heroines, a freedom fighter that rebelled against the Roman government. Her rebellion was the only viable challenge to the supremacy of the Romans who, until the fifth century, exercised a distinct influence over Britain and its heritage. Boudicca was queen of the Iceni people of Eastern England and led a major uprising against occupying Roman forces. Her husband Prasutagus, ruler of the Iceni people of East Anglia, when the Romans conquered southern England in AD 43, they allowed Prasutagus to continue to rule. However, when Prasutagus died the Romans decided to rule the Iceni directly and confiscated the property of the leading tribesmen. They are also said to have stripped and flogged Boudicca and raped her daughters. These actions exacerbated widespread resentment at Roman rule.
Around 60 or 61 AD, while the Roman governor Gaius Suetonius Paullinus was leading a campaign in North Wales, the Iceni rebelled. Members of other tribes joined them. Boudicca's warriors successfully defeated the Roman Ninth Legion and destroyed the capital of Roman Britain, then at Colchester. They went on to destroy London and Verulamium (St Albans). Thousands were killed. Finally, a Roman army led by Paulinus defeated Boudicca. Many Britons were killed and Boudicca is thought to have poisoned herself to avoid capture. The site of the battle, and of Boudicca's death, are unknown.
Boudicca is portrayed as a typical Celtic warrior woman and in the Celtic tradition these legendary women warriors were a big part of history. In Celtic society, females had equal standing to men. they fought and hunted side by side with the men and had the same rights to property and respect. In Celtic lands women were owned communally, and wealth seems to have been based largely on the size of cattle herd owned. The lot of women was a good deal better than in most societies of that time. They were technically equal to men, owned property, and could choose their own husbands. They could also be war leaders, as Boudicca later proved.
However, Boadicca, Queen of the Icenis was of the one most remembered. After their home were savage plundered, the women violated and their men killed, Boadicca formed her “clan of warriors” that swept across Europe defending the Celtic lands and ways and fighting for justice against the Romans. She was later referred to “Amazon”, a term given to all women were honorable, courageous, brave and excelled in combat and did not abide a “patriarch society”. The term ‘Amazon’ is thought to come from an Armenian word, meaning 'moon women'. Artemis or Diana was the goddess of Moon and Hunt and was the Amazon's patron goddess.
Exploring the myth of the ancient Celts especially as they focus on female deities. The myths of the ancient Celts suggest the dominant role of the Celtic female, or at least they point up a society that was at one time ‘matrifocused’, that is, focused on women. Further, the evolution of these myths suggests a distinct shift in consciousness shaped by the warrior ethos. "Women were highly honored, female symbolism formed the most sacred images in the religious cosmos, and the relationship with motherhood was the central elements of the social fabric, the society was held together by common allegiance to the customs of the tribe loosely organized around the traditions of the goddess".
In Irish mythology and later Arthurian tales, women warriors teach the famous heroes chivalry, mystical wisdom (possibly Druidic lore), and feats of arms. The wooing of Emer is one such tale. Scáthach nUanaind taught the great Irish hero Cúchulainn, on the Isle of Skye, how to fight. Skye was one of many schools or academies of martial arts run by women. The myths say it takes these women a year and a day to train a hero.
These women warriors are called banaisgedaig, ban feinnidi, and bantuathaig and they are credited as having the magical power of transformation, somewhat like berserker rage, where the face is flush red and the neck and arms swell. On the whole, these female champions are described as both beautiful and courageous. These heroines were not all muscle and no brains; they were also accomplished in the arts and sciences. Sometimes referred to as Ban-faith or "prophetess" they were experts in divination and supernatural wisdom. If these female heroines were indeed Ban-faiths, then it these warrior women were also a subclass of the Druids, just as the Faiths and Ovates were a subclass of the Druids.
In a nutshell, the Celtic warrior women represent all the values to rule a society, they are synonym of courage and leadership, and their feats a bequest of freedom

i am just highlighting a few words for possible later reference.
thanks for a good account.
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Sun Nov 22, 2009 5:00 pm

dearlg1 wrote:
Boudicca

Boudicca (Boadicea) is one of Britain’s greatest heroines, a freedom fighter that rebelled against the Roman government. Her rebellion was the only viable challenge to the supremacy of the Romans who, until the fifth century, exercised a distinct influence over Britain and its heritage. Boudicca was queen of the Iceni people of Eastern England and led a major uprising against occupying Roman forces. Her husband Prasutagus, ruler of the Iceni people of East Anglia, when the Romans conquered southern England in AD 43, they allowed Prasutagus to continue to rule. However, when Prasutagus died the Romans decided to rule the Iceni directly and confiscated the property of the leading tribesmen. They are also said to have stripped and flogged Boudicca and raped her daughters. These actions exacerbated widespread resentment at Roman rule.
Around 60 or 61 AD, while the Roman governor Gaius Suetonius Paullinus was leading a campaign in North Wales, the Iceni rebelled. Members of other tribes joined them. Boudicca's warriors successfully defeated the Roman Ninth Legion and destroyed the capital of Roman Britain, then at Colchester. They went on to destroy London and Verulamium (St Albans). Thousands were killed. Finally, a Roman army led by Paulinus defeated Boudicca. Many Britons were killed and Boudicca is thought to have poisoned herself to avoid capture. The site of the battle, and of Boudicca's death, are unknown.
Boudicca is portrayed as a typical Celtic warrior woman and in the Celtic tradition these legendary women warriors were a big part of history. In Celtic society, females had equal standing to men. they fought and hunted side by side with the men and had the same rights to property and respect. In Celtic lands women were owned communally, and wealth seems to have been based largely on the size of cattle herd owned. The lot of women was a good deal better than in most societies of that time. They were technically equal to men, owned property, and could choose their own husbands. They could also be war leaders, as Boudicca later proved.
However, Boadicca, Queen of the Icenis was of the one most remembered. After their home were savage plundered, the women violated and their men killed, Boadicca formed her “clan of warriors” that swept across Europe defending the Celtic lands and ways and fighting for justice against the Romans. She was later referred to “Amazon”, a term given to all women were honorable, courageous, brave and excelled in combat and did not abide a “patriarch society”. The term ‘Amazon’ is thought to come from an Armenian word, meaning 'moon women'. Artemis or Diana was the goddess of Moon and Hunt and was the Amazon's patron goddess.
Exploring the myth of the ancient Celts especially as they focus on female deities. The myths of the ancient Celts suggest the dominant role of the Celtic female, or at least they point up a society that was at one time ‘matrifocused’, that is, focused on women. Further, the evolution of these myths suggests a distinct shift in consciousness shaped by the warrior ethos. "Women were highly honored, female symbolism formed the most sacred images in the religious cosmos, and the relationship with motherhood was the central elements of the social fabric, the society was held together by common allegiance to the customs of the tribe loosely organized around the traditions of the goddess".
In Irish mythology and later Arthurian tales, women warriors teach the famous heroes chivalry, mystical wisdom (possibly Druidic lore), and feats of arms. The wooing of Emer is one such tale. Scáthach nUanaind taught the great Irish hero Cúchulainn, on the Isle of Skye, how to fight. Skye was one of many schools or academies of martial arts run by women. The myths say it takes these women a year and a day to train a hero.
These women warriors are called banaisgedaig, ban feinnidi, and bantuathaig and they are credited as having the magical power of transformation, somewhat like berserker rage, where the face is flush red and the neck and arms swell. On the whole, these female champions are described as both beautiful and courageous. These heroines were not all muscle and no brains; they were also accomplished in the arts and sciences. Sometimes referred to as Ban-faith or "prophetess" they were experts in divination and supernatural wisdom. If these female heroines were indeed Ban-faiths, then it these warrior women were also a subclass of the Druids, just as the Faiths and Ovates were a subclass of the Druids.
In a nutshell, the Celtic warrior women represent all the values to rule a society, they are synonym of courage and leadership, and their feats a bequest of freedom
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Sun Nov 22, 2009 5:48 pm

lavender orchid wrote:
dearlg1 wrote:
Boudicca

Boudicca (Boadicea) is one of Britain’s greatest heroines, a freedom fighter that rebelled against the Roman government. Her rebellion was the only viable challenge to the supremacy of the Romans who, until the fifth century, exercised a distinct influence over Britain and its heritage. Boudicca was queen of the Iceni people of Eastern England and led a major uprising against occupying Roman forces. Her husband Prasutagus, ruler of the Iceni people of East Anglia, when the Romans conquered southern England in AD 43, they allowed Prasutagus to continue to rule. However, when Prasutagus died the Romans decided to rule the Iceni directly and confiscated the property of the leading tribesmen. They are also said to have stripped and flogged Boudicca and raped her daughters. These actions exacerbated widespread resentment at Roman rule.
Around 60 or 61 AD, while the Roman governor Gaius Suetonius Paullinus was leading a campaign in North Wales, the Iceni rebelled. Members of other tribes joined them. Boudicca's warriors successfully defeated the Roman Ninth Legion and destroyed the capital of Roman Britain, then at Colchester. They went on to destroy London and Verulamium (St Albans). Thousands were killed. Finally, a Roman army led by Paulinus defeated Boudicca. Many Britons were killed and Boudicca is thought to have poisoned herself to avoid capture. The site of the battle, and of Boudicca's death, are unknown.
Boudicca is portrayed as a typical Celtic warrior woman and in the Celtic tradition these legendary women warriors were a big part of history. In Celtic society, females had equal standing to men. they fought and hunted side by side with the men and had the same rights to property and respect. In Celtic lands women were owned communally, and wealth seems to have been based largely on the size of cattle herd owned. The lot of women was a good deal better than in most societies of that time. They were technically equal to men, owned property, and could choose their own husbands. They could also be war leaders, as Boudicca later proved.
However, Boadicca, Queen of the Icenis was of the one most remembered. After their home were savage plundered, the women violated and their men killed, Boadicca formed her “clan of warriors” that swept across Europe defending the Celtic lands and ways and fighting for justice against the Romans. She was later referred to “Amazon”, a term given to all women were honorable, courageous, brave and excelled in combat and did not abide a “patriarch society”. The term ‘Amazon’ is thought to come from an Armenian word, meaning 'moon women'. Artemis or Diana was the goddess of Moon and Hunt and was the Amazon's patron goddess.
Exploring the myth of the ancient Celts especially as they focus on female deities. The myths of the ancient Celts suggest the dominant role of the Celtic female, or at least they point up a society that was at one time ‘matrifocused’, that is, focused on women. Further, the evolution of these myths suggests a distinct shift in consciousness shaped by the warrior ethos. "Women were highly honored, female symbolism formed the most sacred images in the religious cosmos, and the relationship with motherhood was the central elements of the social fabric, the society was held together by common allegiance to the customs of the tribe loosely organized around the traditions of the goddess".
In Irish mythology and later Arthurian tales, women warriors teach the famous heroes chivalry, mystical wisdom (possibly Druidic lore), and feats of arms. The wooing of Emer is one such tale. Scáthach nUanaind taught the great Irish hero Cúchulainn, on the Isle of Skye, how to fight. Skye was one of many schools or academies of martial arts run by women. The myths say it takes these women a year and a day to train a hero.
These women warriors are called banaisgedaig, ban feinnidi, and bantuathaig and they are credited as having the magical power of transformation, somewhat like berserker rage, where the face is flush red and the neck and arms swell. On the whole, these female champions are described as both beautiful and courageous. These heroines were not all muscle and no brains; they were also accomplished in the arts and sciences. Sometimes referred to as Ban-faith or "prophetess" they were experts in divination and supernatural wisdom. If these female heroines were indeed Ban-faiths, then it these warrior women were also a subclass of the Druids, just as the Faiths and Ovates were a subclass of the Druids.
In a nutshell, the Celtic warrior women represent all the values to rule a society, they are synonym of courage and leadership, and their feats a bequest of freedom

i am just highlighting a few words for possible later reference. and checking on a sound translation compatible with holistic ideals.
thanks for a good account, meanwhile.

.
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   Mon Nov 23, 2009 7:15 am

The Last Rose or Summer-Thomas Moore
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nc55QYn970

The Last Rose with Andre Rieu his orchestra, choir and the sopranos Suzan Erens (Holland), Carmen Monarcha (Brazil) and Carla Maffioletti (Brazil) in Kerkrade Holland Composers: Music: Thomas Moore...


The Last Rose or Summer-Thomas Moore

'Tis the last rose of summer
Left blooming alone;
All her lovely companions
Are faded and gone;
No flower of her kindred,
No rosebud is nigh,
To reflect back her blushes,
To give sigh for sigh.
I'll not leave thee, thou lone one!
To pine on the stem;
Since the lovely are sleeping,
Go, sleep thou with them.
Thus kindly I scatter,
Thy leaves o'er the bed,
Where thy mates of the garden
Lie scentless and dead.
So soon may I follow,
When friendships decay,
From Love's shining circle
The gems drop away.
When true hearts lie withered
And fond ones are flown,
Oh! who would inhabit,
This bleak world alone?
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PostSubject: Re: Celtic Art & Music   

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Celtic Art & Music
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BreakAwayForum :: The Mayville Cultural Center :: The Mayville arts gallery and museum-
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